Concrete Revolutio and The Courage to Change the World

Conrevo 8.3.png

“I’m weak, that’s why I wanted to grow stronger”

Katararezu Tomo

Those words always rang in my mind every day of my life.

Highschool are probably still one of the most shaky times of my life in terms of my identity and belief. It’s also the first time where I’d become more aware about current political climate and various issues in the world, particularly surrounding the Islamic world, where I was previously ignorant of it.

To this day, I still think what a blissful ignorant that was. All of the revelation became too much for my poor mind, which resulted in me trying the best I can to be always in the dark regarding discussion on Islamic politics.

One of my former classmate however, whom I shall only refer to on this post as R, embrace that revelation. R was intelligent, driven, sociable and probably one-of-the kind person that I’ve ever met in my life. Much like the superhumans in Conrevo, he’s passionate to change world. At the same time however, he also held belief that, in my mind, both naive and extreme which always makes me uneasy. I never tried to voice my disagreement whenever he spouted his belief, which to my annoyance he often does whenever opportunity present itself, because I can’t ever get the correct words right and frankly, I’m too cowardly.

Nonetheless, his passion are undeniable. He even managed to inspire many of my own friends to agree with him. Despite my disagreement of his view, being socially inept for most of the time, I’m always jealous over his boldness and his ability to influence other people around him, often for positive effect. And so, despite my unwillingness to engage in discussion, my jealousy did became my drive to learn more and think critically about narrative, fiction or otherwise, which helped me to learn more about human condition, and to some extension, how various system came to be. I wanted to be able to voice my concern about R’s belief or anyone else sharing his belief and discuss it with them.

I wanted to grow stronger.

This is how I sometimes imagine myself in my struggle ūüėõ

Concrete Revolutio’s main protagonist, Jiro Hitoyoshi, is on shaky position in the beginning of the series second season. Having been betrayed twice by the person he look up to, the first time by Rainbow Knight when he discovers his role at children kidnapping case when he was young and by his own father when Jiro learn his role at covering up the event, Jiro left the Superhuman Bureau to help superhumans individually and to search for his ideal justice.

In truth however, much like me but for slightly different reason, Jiro was running¬†away. Refusing to accept how he can’t ever find “true” justice¬†and refusing to ever learn about the reason behind the sacrifice both of his “heroes” made, even after he can’t come up with better alternative.

It’s also why, throughout the series, Jiro refuse to identify himself as a superhuman. Both because he believe he can’t ever be the ideal superhuman that he always imagine (the paragon of the absolute right) ¬†and acknowledging himself as a superhuman also means acknowledging the difficult societal question that prompt the uneasy compromise both his father and Rainbow Knight made in each of their pursuit of the “right” thing to do, acknowledging that, in this world with different people and different priority, “true” justice is almost impossible.

This all comes to a head in episode 22, “The Era of Giant Gods”, in which Jiro was confronted with the horrible realization regarding Rainbow Knight and his part of killing him, and during the NUTS rampage whose pilots mirror his angry confused younger self. After a pep talk by his former bureau colleague, Jiro confront his younger self, and in the guise of “helping crying children”, essentially killed his younger self.

After that confrontation, ¬†Jiro learn from his father of the true nature behind the bureau establishment, and by some extension, finally accept the ambiguity aspect¬†of the world. This all comes in the final episode in which Jiro declare himself as a superhuman, ready to fight for a better world even after realizing the difficulty in finding the “right” thing to do.

Side Note:

  • Ironically, Jiro died few minutes after he declare that. Granted, he sacrifice himself to become the embodiment of the ideal justice he imagined, but still….
  • It took me 2 draft and some pondering to finally finish this. One of the problem was because plenty of observation on the series has been done already that I’m pretty stunted on what to focus on. In the end, I went with a more personal tone :3

 

 

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One comment

  1. Frog-kun · September 13

    I’m so happy you’ve taken the time to share your experience with Concrete Revolutio.

    The anime had a similar impact on me. Much like you, I’m still working out my opinions on complex issues while staying true to my moral principles, and Concrete Revolutio articulated that confusion extremely well.

    I think there’s a kind of comfort in knowing exactly where you stand all the time. A part of me can’t help but admire people who seem so sure of their convictions, even when they tend to see issues in black-and-white terms. At the same time, I can’t bring myself to indulge in that comfort myself.

    There’s probably a bit of Jiro in all of us.

    This is quite a messy, disfigured comment, and I don’t really have a conclusion to my thoughts, but that’s quite like the experience of watching Concrete Revolutio itself, no?

    Again, thanks for writing up this post. You got me thinking about all the things I love about Conrevo again.

    Liked by 1 person

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